Mark McMillan left his small hometown, situated just across the border in Tennessee, early Sunday morning headed toward Oxford. He says what he saw later...

  The Peabody Award-winning ESPN documentary series “30 for 30” continues with tonight’s episode, “Ghost of Ole Miss.” The narrative, based on the long-format story by ESPN.com writer and Oxford resident Wright Thompson, who wrote and narrated the 1-hour documentary, explores the intersection in history of the undefeated 1962 Ole Miss...

  The Peabody Award-winning ESPN documentary series “30 for 30” continues with tonight’s episode, “Ghost of Ole Miss.” The narrative, based on the long-format story by ESPN.com writer and Oxford resident Wright Thompson, who wrote and narrated the 1-hour documentary, explores the intersection in history of the undefeated 1962 Ole Miss...

  Many students and faculty associate James Meredith’s arrival with the opening of the doors of opportunity to the black community. But to Ariel Blanco, president of the Latin American Student Association, the promotion of Meredith’s integration signifies something more. “Integration means a mix of cultures, ethnic, racial, religious and creed differences,”...

  Riots overtook The University of Mississippi on Sept. 30, 1962. The reason – the pigment of a single man’s skin. The admission of James Meredith, the first black person integrated into Ole Miss, created an integration struggle that allowed prejudice to hang heavily in the air. Nonetheless, Ole Miss made a change, a change that many forms of media have hyped,...

On Oct. 1, 1962, James Meredith became the first black man to attend Ole Miss, making history and changing the future of The University of Mississippi forever. To commemorate the occasion, the university is hosting a number of events centering on Meredith to celebrate the anniversary, labeling it “50 Years of Integration: Opening the Closed Society.” Chancellor Dan...

This week marks 50 years of integration at The University of Mississippi. It is important that we take time to reflect on the progress the university has made to transform its obstinate outlook during the civil rights movement to a more open and accepting place.  Looking beyond the university, it is much more important to focus on the accomplishments of black alumni as...

Professor and historian David Sansing hosted a discussion at the Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics Thursday morning to assess the progress made at The University of Mississippi since the enrollment of James Meredith. The panel was composed of Sansing; Donald Cole, assistant provost and assistant to the chancellor concerning minority affairs; Valeria Ross,...

Retired Bishop Duncan Gray Jr. of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi is donating a personal collection of documents chronicling the period of integration at The University of Mississippi to the J.D. Williams Library special collection of civil rights history. The Civil Rights collection housed within the J.D. Williams Library Archives and Special Collections contains...

“I believe in segregation like I believe in Jesus.” The previous statement is entirely fictitious. Admittedly embellished, as well, yet it embodies the ideology of some of those who were strongly opposed to James Meredith enrolling in classes at The University of Mississippi. Meredith had to overcome more than Ross Barnett’s personal rejection to the...