In 1962, U.S. Marshals were ordered to go to The Univer- sity of Mississippi to escort James Meredith so he could enroll in classes. Five of those marshals returned to the Ole Miss Student Union Monday morning to speak about their experience on campus during the 1962 integration. People filled the ballroom in the Union to hear the panel of five former U.S. Marshals and...

Fifty years ago to the day, racism and riots engulfed The University of Mississippi campus. Students, faculty and visitors came together Sunday night to commemorate the remarkable accomplishment by James Meredith in 1962. This week celebrates integration at Ole Miss, which began with Meredith’s admission 50 years ago. The Statewide Day of Remembrance: A Walk of Reconciliation...

The fires of revulsion spread wildly and untamed in Mississippi and on The University of Mississippi’s campus on Sept. 30, 1962, injuring several people and resulting in the death of two men. It was on this day that 29-year-old James Meredith made history by becoming the first black student admitted to Ole Miss. However, his arrival in Oxford and admittance into the...

Raymond Martin of Atlanta was 9 years old when James Meredith made history as the first black student to attend The University of Mississippi. As a little boy in 1962, Martin remembered troops around Oxford, a lot of confusion and “just a prayer for the future.” The tense and violent atmosphere led his parents’ decision not to walk around town anymore....

  The Ole Miss and Oxford communities celebrated Independence Day on July 4, 2012, starting in the Grove with activities, ceremonies and a band, and moving to Oxford University Stadium for fireworks. PHOTOS by CAIN MADDEN/The Daily Mississippian.     ...

    1- Calvin James, 4, holds a 175th birthday balloon to his head to block out the sun. 2- Payton Bjork, 6, throws a ball in an attempt to dunk his father, Athletics Director Ross Bjork, in a pool of water. Payton dunked his father 15 times. 3- Athletics Director Ross Bjork is dunked in a pool of water. 4- Pressley Windham, 20-months old, pets a goat...

“Out on Highway 6, below the five white crosses, beneath five memorial dogwoods, a marker bears all their names. Margaret Emily Gardner. Mary Pat Langford. Elizabeth Gage Roberson. Robin Renee Simmons. Ruth Hess Worsham.” The tragic story of how five Ole Miss sorority sisters lost their lives 25 years ago is told in the May issue of “O, The Oprah...

The University of Mississippi and Oxford communities had the opportunity to hear U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speak last night at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts. Holder, who spoke for the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College fall convocation, discussed the progress integration has made and the journey still ahead. Chancellor Dan Jones also...

Fifty years after James Meredith enrolled at Ole Miss, Matthew Graves, producer and director at The University of Mississippi Media and Documentary Projects division, has paid tribute to Meredith in the form of a documentary film, “Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss.” Graves learned of Meredith and the struggle to integrate The University...

A half century ago, James Meredith drew the world’s attention to The University of Mississippi when he became the first black man to walk onto campus as a member of the student body. After battling the administration, state legislature and even Governor Ross Barnett himself, Meredith was finally allowed to transfer from Jackson State College – after the intervention...